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News about W3C
  • Google's Polymer 1.0 brings reuse and better branding to Web development

    Signaling Polymer's production readiness, Google announced release 1.0 at its annual I/O developer conference. A core library used to build and style Web components, Polymer transitioned rapidly from concept to production release in less than two years.

    Written by Steven Max Patterson30 May 15 04:51
  • Microsoft open-sources JavaScript tools

    Continuing its overtures toward open source, Microsoft is unveiling technologies for packaging applications and remotely debugging JavaScript.

    Written by Paul Krill02 May 15 00:06
  • Phoning Firefox: Browser now makes Web calls

    Mozilla today shipped Firefox 22, enabling the in-browser audio-video calling standard WebRTC and switching on a new JavaScript module that promises to speed up Web apps.

    Written by Gregg Keizer25 June 13 18:49
  • EFF blasts proposed DRM features in HTML5

    The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has issued an angry formal response to a proposed set of HTML5 standards from the World Wide Web Consortium, saying that stringent digital rights management technology will be harmful to online freedom and prevent many users from getting access to important content.

    Written by Jon Gold31 May 13 20:59
  • W3C: HTML5 will be finished in 2014

    Those curious about the final release date for the hotly debated HTML5 need wonder no more: The W3C (World Wide Web Consortium) plans to finalize the standard by July 2014, the organization announced Monday.

    Written by Joab Jackson15 Feb. 11 01:09
Tutorials about W3C
  • 4 Client-Side Web Storage Options That Replace Cookies

    Several standards exist for storing large amounts of data in a user's Web browser. Each has its benefits, tradeoffs, W3C standardization status and level of browser support. All are better than cookies.

    Written by Chris Minnick and Ed Tittel03 Sept. 13 18:09
  • How to Ensure Privacy in the Age of HTML5

    New APIs in the forthcoming HTML5 make it much easier for Web applications to access software and hardware, especially on mobile devices. The W3C is taking privacy seriously as it puts the finishing touches on HTML5, but there are still some important things to consider.

    Written by Chris Minnick and Ed Tittel25 June 13 12:47
Features about W3C
  • Could Facebook be your next phone company?

    <em>This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.</em>

    Written by By Dean Manzoori, Masergy VP for Unified Communications21 March 15 08:23
  • WebRTC close to tipping point as Cisco, Microsoft announce products

    It was all the way back in the Spring of 2011 that Google released <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WebRTC">WebRTC</a>, its nascent real-time, browser-based, HTML5-powered, no-plugin-required video chat project to the public. In the three and a half years since, the Internet Engineering Task Force and the W3C have been working together to try to formalize the standard, prepare the stable 1.0 release, and get it ready for prime time.

    Written by Matt Weinberger22 Nov. 14 01:07
  • Can digital rights management and the open Web coexist?

    The Netflix-backed Encrypted Media Extensions (EME) proposal, and recent revelations that requirements for DRM in HTML5 are confidential, have generated furor among advocates of the Open Web. Let's cut through the hyperbole.

    Written by Chris Minnick and Ed Tittel28 May 14 22:54