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  • When trade secrets meet Facebook

    Social networking sites are changing the way people interact, socially and professionally. Sites like <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9157638/Facebook_Complete_coverage">Facebook</a> and LinkedIn let people establish relationships and store information on their contacts. When effectively used and managed, these sites can significantly increase the productivity of salespeople and other revenue-generating employees. But the use of these social networking sites by employees to manage their business contacts can also have implications when those employees leave to join a competitor. Client lists and customer databases are frequently alleged to be trade secrets. If an employee has used a client list to build a network of links and/or contacts on <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9118182/Facebook_LinkedIn_gain_traction_at_work">Facebook or LinkedIn</a> , does that list lose its <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/print/9140694/A_Practical_Approach_to_Protecting_Trade_Secrets">trade secret</a> status?

    Written by Richard C. Darwin and Erin Welsh24 May 10 07:46
Features about trade secrets
  • A Practical Approach to Protecting Trade Secrets

    Trade secrets are increasingly becoming a company's most valuable assets, and not surprisingly, threats to those assets have increased concomitantly. The greatest threat to company data is, of course, not outsiders but a company's own employees A company's ability to protect against rogue employees (as well as against unintentional harm) is governed by both federal and state laws, which vary by jurisdiction and, worse, are in a state of flux in many of those jurisdictions.

    Written by Russell Beck and Matt Karlyn12 Nov. 09 05:22
  • How to Guard Your Trade Secrets (and Why You Must)

    Trade secrets are key to the survival of any business, but if you aren't careful, modern technologies like BlackBerrys and USB drives (or loose lips) can help them walk right out the door--and without a well-written contract, you may have little legal recourse.

    Written by Mark Grossman30 Jan. 09 06:10
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