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  • iPhone 4 newbies: 10 essential tips and tricks

    You soon-to-be Verizon iPhone 4 customers can learn from the experiences of others. Take it from iPhone old-timers, you're about to enter a magical world of awesome apps running on the most simplistic, addictive device on the planet.

    Written by Tom Kaneshige09 Feb. 11 07:33
  • Smartphone security: Keep your handset safe

    Once upon a time, a phone was just a phone: It simply made and received calls. The only security you worried about was if someone had picked up in the other room to listen in.

    Written by Brent Rose12 Jan. 11 02:07
  • Overclock your smartphone, if you dare

    WARNING: Overclocking is not for the faint of heart. Do not attempt to hack your phone unless you understand and accept the risks of turning it into a useless "brick."

    Written by Keir Thomas05 Jan. 11 12:56
  • BlackBerry 6: Wipe Your Smartphone, Restore Factory Settings

    Many reasons exist for why you might want or need to "security wipe" a BlackBerry, or completely erase all personal data stored on your handheld: You got a new smartphone and plan to retire the older device; you're trading in your existing BlackBerry for a new one from your wireless carrier; you and a friend are swapping devices; you loaded too many applications or media and just want to start over from scratch; etc.

    Written by Al Sacco15 Dec. 10 07:11
  • Root Google Android the easy way

    Google's Android operating system is riding a wave of popularity that has rapidly eclipsed Apple's iOS, and by the end of 2010 it's expected to overtake RIM's BlackBerry as the world's leading smartphone platform. However, despite the relative openness and flexibility of the OS, your Android phone still isn't as powerful and customizable as it could be. To unlock all of your phone's potential, you'll need to root it.

    Written by Robert Strohmeyer15 Sept. 10 23:15
Features about Phones
  • How it works: Iris scanning improves smartphone security

    Samsung and other vendors are beginning to incorporate iris scanning into their mobile devices. We examine how this security technology works, its advantages and its drawbacks.

    Written by Lamont Wood08 Sept. 16 20:00
  • What smartphones will be like in 2012

    Since the advent of the first modern smartphone--arguably the original Apple iPhone in 2007--the power of these mobile computing devices that also happen to make phone calls has advanced by leaps and bounds.

    Written by Jared Newman12 Nov. 11 01:31
  • Apple iOS: Why it's the most secure OS, period

    In June 2007, Apple released the iPhone, and the device quickly took off to become a major brand in the smartphone market. Yet when the iPhone shipped, security on the mobile operating system was nearly nonexistent. Missing from the initial iOS (then called iPhone OS) were many of the security features that modern-day desktop software has as a matter of course, such as data-execution protection (DEP) and address-space layout randomization (ASLR). Apple's cachet lured security researchers to test the platform, and in less than a month, a trio had released details on the first vulnerability: an exploitable flaw in the mobile Safari browser.

    Written by Robert Lemos06 June 11 20:04
  • 5 features iOS needs, in order to sway me from Android

    With Apple preparing to talk about the future of iOS at its Worldwide Developers Conference in June, and the rumor mill churning, it's time for an old tradition: the iPhone feature wish list.

    Written by Jared Newman30 March 11 07:54
  • HTC ThunderBolt 4G smartphone: Hefty but fast

    Even by the new standards of cell phone advertising, the run-up to the HTC ThunderBolt -- Verizon's first 4G LTE smartphone -- was elaborate and expensive. Gatefold ads in mass-market magazines and high-profile TV spots on the Oscars, NASCAR and college basketball all proclaimed that there was a new 4G phone coming from Verizon, but not much else. Inquiries made of HTC and Verizon were met with official shrugs. The company spent many millions of dollars advertising a phone and didn't tell anyone when it would be on the shelves.

    Written by Dan Rosenbaum22 March 11 06:41

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