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  • Intel vs. ARM: Two titans' tangled fate

    Intel has barely made a dent in the mobile market, while ARM has been wildly successful. Does that spell doom for Intel -- or is ARM's triumph overblown?

    Written by Jim Turley27 Feb. 14 14:22
  • The Open Source Rookies of the Year Awards

    , the open source software management company, picks the top 10 open source projects launched in the past year, based on stats collected from the

    Written by Black Duck28 Jan. 14 14:08
  • When in China, don't leave your laptop alone

    If you travel to China or Russia, assume government or industry spooks will steal your data and install spyware. Here's how to thwart them

    Written by Bob Violino04 Dec. 12 11:11
  • How the iPad will change IT forever

    When evaluating the adoption of mobile enterprise applications, it's important to understand the overall trends driving the adoption of the iPad within the enterprise. As I worked on the book, iPad in the Enterprise: Developing and Deploying Business Applications, I spoke to, interviewed, and received feedback from dozens of technology authors, industry analysts, enterprise software executives, Fortune 1000 CIOs, and other visionaries of enterprise IT. I felt that the best way to explore this concept was to hear from those industry leaders directly.

    Written by Nathan Clevenger03 Aug. 11 02:01
  • Apple iOS: Why it's the most secure OS, period

    In June 2007, Apple released the iPhone, and the device quickly took off to become a major brand in the smartphone market. Yet when the iPhone shipped, security on the mobile operating system was nearly nonexistent. Missing from the initial iOS (then called iPhone OS) were many of the security features that modern-day desktop software has as a matter of course, such as data-execution protection (DEP) and address-space layout randomization (ASLR). Apple's cachet lured security researchers to test the platform, and in less than a month, a trio had released details on the first vulnerability: an exploitable flaw in the mobile Safari browser.

    Written by Robert Lemos06 June 11 20:04
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