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  • At what point do white hat hackers cross the ethical line?

    In recent months the news of Chris Roberts alleged hacking of an inflight entertainment system and possibly other parts of the Boeing 737 have sparked a wave of controversy. Public opinion was originally on Roberts' side, but the recent publication of the FBI affidavit changed that drastically. According to the affidavit, Roberts admitted to doing a live "pen-test" of a plane network in mid-air.

    Written by By Ondrej Krehel and Darin Andersen of Cyberunited Lifars15 Aug. 15 07:10
  • Understanding Google's Alphabet structure (think, alpha bet)

    Splitting the name of Google's new holding company Alphabet into two – "alpha" and "bet" – may help explain the new business structure that JP Morgan analyst Doug Anmuth called "an elegant way for Google to continue to pursue long-term, life-changing initiatives while simultaneously increasing transparency and management focus in the core business" in a recent report.

    Written by Steven Max Patterson14 Aug. 15 03:57
  • Will stock, hiring surge at a more transparent Google?

    Google's restructuring could finally deliver to Wall Street something it's been after for years: more insight into what the company is spending on things like Nest, drones and health research.

    Written by Sharon Gaudin12 Aug. 15 06:50
  • Google restructuring could rein in business 'chaos'

    With the restructuring of its business announced Monday, Google may be trying to gain control over the chaos that its myriad of projects and new business ventures has created.

    Written by Sharon Gaudin12 Aug. 15 01:12
  • Making the case for agile in the enterprise

    By now, you know about agile methodologies and how they can help improve your software development efforts. In this series of articles, we will discuss benefits of going agile (Part 1), some traditional concerns with agile at enterprise scale (Part 2) and offer some strategies you can use to become more agile in your shop while minimizing those concerns (Part 3). We also include screencasts to show agile in real-world scenarios.

    Written by Joe Mack23 June 15 07:08
  • The No. 1 large place to work in IT: Quicken Loans

    Ask Bobby Martin what he likes best about working for Quicken Loans when he's front and center at a Detroit Red Wings hockey game, and he'd be hard-pressed not to name the scores of free tickets available to any employee.

    Written by Beth Stackpole22 June 15 23:37
  • The No. 1 small place to work in IT: Noah Consulting

    Noah Consulting is a completely virtual company -- its 89 employees live and work in various cities and states nationwide. But those 89 people say they feel completely connected with and supported by their colleagues and supervisors, and that's a big part of the reason why, for the second year in a row, the consultancy was named the No. 1 small employer on Computerworld's list of the 100 Best Places to Work in IT.

    Written by Mary K. Pratt22 June 15 23:35
  • How we chose the Best Places to Work in IT 2015

    For the 22nd year in a row, Computerworld conducted a survey to identify the 100 best places to work for IT professionals. As we first did in 2014, this year we once again present the top organization data sorted by size.

    Written by Mari Keefe, Tracy Mayor22 June 15 23:31
  • Tour the three No. 1 Best Places

    Competition was fierce this year to determine Computerworld's 100 Best Places to Work in IT. In a white-hot jobs market, organizations are pulling out the stops to attract and retain talented, visionary tech workers.

    Written by Tracy Mayor22 June 15 23:30
  • 9 hot enterprise storage companies to watch

    Amidst all the venture investments this year in startups that generate gobs of data -- from those focused on everything from apps to drones to the Internet of Things to Big Data -- are a batch of newcomers aiming to help organizations store and access all that information. Yes, storage companies are pulling in big bucks in 2015, as they did in 2014, and a couple have even double-dipped this year and announced two rounds of funding.

    Written by Bob Brown12 June 15 01:44
  • Find your next job with the Tinder-like Switch app

    It seems every new app is quickly hailed as the Uber, Spotify, or Netflix of some other industry. But with Switch, it really is the Tinder of job searching -- right down to swiping left and right to indicate your mutual interest. However, instead of swiping on potential suitors, you'll swipe left or right on potential jobs. And employers will do the same to you.

    Written by Sarah K. White11 June 15 01:18
  • How to win the hiring war for graduating millennials

    The class of 2015 has done its homework. According to research from the Accenture Strategy 2015 U.S. College Graduate Employment Study, new grads have responded to the growing need for STEM degrees. They're thinking about the potential for a long-term career before choosing their major. They're pursuing internships and ongoing training opportunities. And, for the most part, colleges are successfully preparing them for jobs and careers and are helping them look for work.

    Written by Sharon Florentine10 June 15 02:05
  • How unconscious bias impacts IT recruiting and hiring

    Making recruiting and hiring decisions based on a candidate's height sounds ludicrous, right? And yet, according to research from Timothy A. Judge and Daniel M. Cable, published in the June 2004 issue of Journal of Applied Psychology, there's a perception that height correlates with success. While only 15 percent of American men are taller than six feet, more than 60 percent of corporate CEOs are over six feet tall.

    Written by Sharon Florentine21 May 15 05:28
  • How Aflac put claims processing in the fast lane

    When it comes down to it, insurance is little more than an assurance. "When you think about what we sell, you can't touch it, you can't see it, you can't smell it. Our product is nothing more than a promise to be there when you need it," says Michael Zuna, CMO of Aflac, an insurer with $120 billion in assets. "And that happens when you submit a claim."

    Written by Stephanie Overby13 May 15 00:23
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