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  • Run multiple security software products

    QUESTION: I've been told that I shouldn't have more than one antivirus program running on my PC. Can I use both McAfee and Microsoft Anti-Spyware (or another spyware application), for example? I want to be extra safe online, and I know that security suites are often good in some areas but not in all. Is there a list that will tell me what I can and can't use together?

    Written by Chris Byers18 Aug. 10 04:25
  • How did my protected PC get infected?

    SUPERAntiSpyware found three Trojans on a reader's PC. He asked the <a href="http://forums.pcworld.com/index.php?/forum/2000-windows/">Windows</a> forum how this could happen when his PC is protected.

    Written by Lincoln Spector17 Aug. 10 02:37
Features about antivirus
  • ClamAV promises free antivirus app for businesses

    Most of us don't like paying for antivirus (AV) software, but at least home users can rely on one of the free options, such as Microsoft Security Essentials, avast!, or AVG Free.

    Written by Keir Thomas19 Jan. 11 05:34
  • Free vs. fee: Free, paid antivirus programs

    Depending on whom you ask, paying for antivirus software is either a good investment or a total ripoff. In reality, neither viewpoint is accurate. You can find plenty of good reasons to choose a paid antivirus product, and plenty of good reasons to go with a freebie.

    Written by Nick Mediati30 Nov. 10 13:45
  • What Are the Most Overrated Security Technologies?

    The security community has grown to depend on some basic technologies in the fight against cyber thieves, such as antivirus software and firewalls. But are practitioners clinging to tools that outlived their usefulness long ago? Were those tools ever really useful to begin with?

    Written by Bill Brenner25 March 10 06:53
  • Trend Micro CEO: hackers hitting AV infrastructure

    It's become an all-too-common scam: A legitimate Web site pops up a window that looks just like a real security warning. It says there's something wrong with the computer, and click here to fix it. A few clicks later, the victim is paying out US$40 for some bogus software, called rogue antivirus.

    Written by Robert McMillan26 Oct. 09 08:28

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