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In pictures: Sydney University's TechLab

  • Geoffrey Brown, director, innovation, solutions and engagement services, information and communications technology, the University of Sydney (left) with Jim Cook, innovation project lead.

  • A remote controlled mobile teleconferencing system, manufactured by Double Robotics.

  • Apple iPad attached to the top of the Double mobile teleconferencing system.

  • Apple iPad

  • Big Data in action. A look at small arms and ammunition imports and exports worldwide over an 18-year period, sourced from freely available United Nations data. The university will soon be able to use data to visualise where research publications, created by its academics, are being cited and published worldwide. "From semester 1 next year we will have a live feed streaming into this engine that will allow us to do that," says innovation project lead Jim Cook.

  • Using publicly-available data to visualise projected flight paths of asteroids in our solar system. Spectrometry techniques have been used to identify the masses of minerals in each asteroid and calculate their dollar worth. (Some are worth many trillions of dollars).

  • Even more Big Data. The free BioDigital Human app lets users visualise digestion, respiratory, lymphatic, nervous and cardiovascular body systems as well as ligaments, muscles and other body parts. Beats a text book any day.

  • The respiratory system with movement to demonstrate how the organs work together.

  • Jim Cook uses the Microsoft Kinect technology to grab and rotate an image of a human heart using data from multiple sources.

  • Jim Cook uses the Microsoft Kinect technology.

  • CIO Online editor Byron Connolly uses virtual reality equipment for a 3D view the Earth, Sun, Moon and other objects in space.

  • CIO Online editor Byron Connolly uses virtual reality equipment.

  • Jim Cook uses the NeuroSky Mindwave brain scanner.

  • Jim's brainwaves shown on screen.

  • A $2000 3D printer.

  • Objects created with the 3D printer.

  • A working wrench created with the 3D printer.

  • A 3D print of a microscopic protein blown up trillions of times.

  • Objects created with the 3D printer.

  • Objects created with the 3D printer.

  • 3D printer

  • 3D printer

  • A 3D print of CIO Online editor Byron Connolly's torso.

  • Unfortunately, the print failed but a new one (with a head) is in the mail.

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