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Stories by Brad Reed

iPhone vs. Droid vs. BlackBerry

In terms of reputation and popularity, the Apple iPhone is still the king of the smartphone market in the United States. But the newest RIM BlackBerry and Motorola Droid models are giving Apple a run for its money.

Written by Brad Reed07 June 10 15:46

Verizon, IBM team on cloud-based storage

Verizon Business and IBM are now offering a joint service aimed at helping large businesses safely store large chunks of data within the Verizon cloud.

Written by Brad Reed31 March 10 22:37

A techie's guide to "Lost"

From enabling time travel to summoning smoke monsters, "Lost" gadgets can do it all!

Written by Brad Reed04 Feb. 10 07:43

Verizon gets into cloud consulting

If you run an IT department, chances are you've been bombarded by vendors hyping their own brand of cloud computing services over the last year.

Written by Brad Reed02 Dec. 09 17:18

Gartner picks eight mobile techs to watch

Mobile user interfaces and a new version of Bluetooth top Gartner Research's list of mobile technologies to watch in 2009 and 2010.

Written by Brad Reed02 Feb. 09 08:26

Fighting e-waste one mobile phone at a time

With most Americans switching their mobile handsets once every 18 months, the need to find safe ways to dispose of old mobile phones has only grown. ReCellular, a self-described "electronics-sustainability" firm based in the US, has spent the past two decades working with the US-based Cellular Telecommunications and Internet Association (CTIA) to become a major recycler and reseller of mobile handsets and accessories. Every day, ReCellular processes thousands of unwanted handsets and either fixes them for resale or sends them off to be melted down and recycled. ReCellular Vice President Mike Newman spoke with Brad Reed about how his company is helping to reduce e-waste, as well as how enterprises can benefit from donating their mobile devices for reuse and recycling.

Written by Brad Reed25 Nov. 08 09:42

Eight ways technology has shaped the US elections

Technology has played a particularly prominent role in the 2008 US elections -- and it isn't just the typical silliness over whether a candidate really claimed to have invented a key piece of technology. Throughout the year we've seen technological advances used both for good, such as using Short Message Service to announce a vice presidential pick, and for bad, such as hacking into another vice presidential pick's private e-mail account. In this story, we'll take a look at the eight techiest moments of the 2008 presidential race, including YouTube debates, viral videos and e-voting controversies.

Written by Brad Reed16 Oct. 08 08:16
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Techworld
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