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Stories by Brad Reed

The Galaxy Tab: Samsung has a hit on its hands

While Samsung’s Galaxy Tab isn’t as big a hit as Apple’s iPad, it has sold briskly and has reached the 1 million mark less than two months after its first release.

Written by Brad Reed04 Dec. 10 06:43

4G to cover more than 4 billion people by 2015

More than 60 per cent of the world's population will have access to some form of 4G mobile broadband technology by 2015, according to a new report from ABI Research.

Written by Brad Reed30 Nov. 10 08:35

What to expect from next month's Verizon LTE launch

Now that Verizon has started cranking up its hype machine for its LTE commercial launch next month, it's fair to wonder just what types of devices will run on the network.

Written by Brad Reed24 Nov. 10 09:03

Android will take 15% of tablet market next year

Not content to gobble up smartphone market share, the Android operating system is poised to capture 15 per cent of the tablet market in 2011, according to IMS Research.

Written by Brad Reed19 Nov. 10 04:24

Google Nexus One sequel plans leaked

Google's Nexus One phone wasn't exactly a smash hit, but that apparently hasn't stopped the company from issuing a sequel.

Written by Brad Reed12 Nov. 10 09:24

Droid Pro tests Android's enterprise chops

Although businesses have been spending more money on Android-based phones recently, they'll have their first opportunity on Tuesday to order an Android phone tailored specifically to enterprise users.

Written by Brad Reed10 Nov. 10 08:31

Android users split between Froyo, Éclair

According to data released by Google Tuesday, 36 per cent of Android users are running the 2.2 (Froyo) version of the mobile operating system while 41 per cent are running the 2.1 (Éclair) version of the software.  Earlier versions of Android, such as 1.5 and 1.6, are now being used on less than a quarter of Android devices, according to Google.

Written by Brad Reed03 Nov. 10 06:55

How 'smart antennas' could boost Wi-Fi performance

We've all had the problem of going into a crowded Starbucks and suffering through a substandard Wi-Fi signal, most likely caused by too few access points and too many end users. But what if Wi-Fi antennas could do a better job of detecting how many devices were in a given room and could push data out to them more rapidly on a one-by-one basis? That's what researchers at Gonzaga University are trying to accomplish by testing "smart antenna" technology in their new research lab that just received a federal research grant worth nearly $1.2 million from the National Science Foundation. In this interview, we ask Gonzaga electrical engineering associate professor Steve Schennum to outline the basics of smart antenna systems, to describe how they'll improve Wi-Fi performance and to describe how a smart antenna lab would help out small wireless companies.

Written by Brad Reed20 Oct. 10 09:09