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16.5k malware infections reported daily in Australia

16.5k malware infections reported daily in Australia

ACMA spotlights daily malware infections

The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) has launched a webpage which reveals that an average 16,500 cases of malware have been reported to Australian Internet service providers on every day this year.

The report is sent to 130 participants of the Australian Internet Security Initiative (AISI). The AISI malware statistics webpage is updated each morning with statistics on the number of infections, including the top 20 infection types reported.

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According to ACMA, the most prevalent infection type is numerous variants of the Zeus malware.

“Zeus is primarily used for banking fraud, and among other things, can intercept and modify an infected user’s online banking transactions,” ACMA deputy chairman Richard Bean said in a statement.

This allows cyber criminals to steal money from an infected user’s bank account.

“Just as the Internet increasingly provides rapid access to information about news, events and the activities of friends and family, it should also enable Australians to quickly get information about online risks and threats such as malware infections,” he said.

ISPs are expected to alert their infected customers, provide general advice on how to address the malware infection and help prevent future infections.

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Tags zeussecurityACMAmalwareAustralian Internet Security Initiative

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