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Google Music takes on Apple iTunes, Amazon

Google Music takes on Apple iTunes, Amazon

Cloud-based music service may be the cornerstone of a Google social network

Google kicked off its annual Google I/O developers conference by giving people what they'd been speculating about for months - an online music service.

During a keynote presentation on the first day of the conference, Google took the wraps off Music Beta by Google, a service that will enable users to store their music in the cloud and then stream it to any device - tablets, smartphones or PCs.

The company noted that during the beta, the service will be free, although the eventual price tag was not disclosed. All of the Google I/O attendees were invited to join the beta. Anyone interested can sign up on the music beta Web site and request an invitation.

"For Google, it's yet another service that can deliver eyeballs to Google pages and advertisers," said Dan Olds, an analyst with The Gabriel Consulting Group. "It's not a music store yet, but can that be far behind? And if it does become a full-fledged music and media store, it has the potential to break Apple's hammerlock on content providers."

With the Android platform growing rapidly, the music service has a good synergism, Olds added. "As Android devices multiply, it gives Google a bigger and bigger base to sell to," he said. "It also gives Android device sellers a powerful selling point vs. iPhones and iPads."

Music Beta by Google will compete with Amazon's Cloud Player, a cloud-based service announced in late March. It also will vie with other industry players like Apple's hugely popular iTunes and the music-streaming service Rhapsody.

"It's a direct threat to Apple, mainly due to Google's reach and staying power," Olds said. "To other content players, like Amazon, which is in the early stages of the music business, Google's entry into the market has to give them pause."

The service should look familiar to people who already using online music services.

While at this point, Google doesn't have a repository of music that people can buy and download, when users upload their own music, they can sort it into playlists based on artists, songs or genres. And when they add new music to their computer, it automatically will be added to their Google Music library. As another irritant to Apple, Google also is allowing users to upload their iTunes library and playlists.

And Google being Google, there's also a search engine to help people find the song they're looking for. There's also an option to listen to music offline, and an Instant Mix feature that will suggest songs the service thinks go well together.

Music wasn't the only entertainment genre that Google touched on Tuesday.

The company also announced that Android Market will now offer full-length movies starting at $1.99 a piece, but more may be charged for popular films.

Google's music, and to a lesser extent, movie, announcements may also fuel speculation that the company is focused on building a social networking platform to compete against Facebook.

Industry analysts have long speculated that Google is developing a social network, and that music, gaming and movies could play a big role in it.

Google's music service isn't the social platform that the industry has been anticipating. However, it could be a building block for one.

Ezra Gottheil, an analyst with Technology Business Research, said music could be a tough pillar on which to build a social network. Even Apple, having a strong base with its iTunes store, hasn't made huge waves with Ping, its music-based social network.

"A cloud-based music service is potentially very strong for Android, for advertising, for general stickiness," Gottheil said. "But it's more a shot at Apple than at FaceBook."

However, Rob Enderle, an analyst with the Enderle Group, disagreed, noting that music, gaming and movies could be part of a Google social network.

"Certainly, this could be social because you could share what you're listening to with all your friends," said Rob Enderle,. "This certainly could be used as a first step to Google starting a social network."

Sharon Gaudin covers the Internet and Web 2.0, emerging technologies, and desktop and laptop chips for Computerworld. Follow Sharon on Twitter at @sgaudin or subscribe to Sharon's RSS feed. Her e-mail address is sgaudin@computerworld.com.

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