Menu
Menu
Greenpeace: Apple the top environmental offender in tech

Greenpeace: Apple the top environmental offender in tech

Greenpeace slams Apple over cloud computing facility claiming the company is the worst environmental offender in tech.

Apple has long prided itself on the environmental consciousness behind its products, and consistently aims to get greener. But according to Greenpeace's report ] measuring the amount and type of energy consumed by top tech companies' data centers, Apple is doing a poor job with its energy consumption.

The report, "How Dirty is Your Data?", compared Apple to other top tech companies such as Amazon's Web Services, Facebook, Google, HP, Microsoft, Twitter, and Yahoo. Apple scored the lowest -- 6.7 per cent -- in its overall Clean Energy Index, while Yahoo scored the highest, with 55.9 per cent. Apple was also the worst offender in terms of coal intensity, scoring 54.5 per cent, with Facebook trailing closely behind with 53.2 per cent.

Accepting the brunt of the blame is Apple's 500,000-square-foot facility coming online in Maiden, North Carolina -- a facility that, according to Greenpeace, will consume as much energy as 80,000 U.S. homes. Greenpeace does give props for Apple's transparency about the environmental footprint of its hardware -- such as MacBooks and iPhones -- it received a C-grade for transparency when it comes to the current or expected impacts of its online products.

Apple also got an F-grade for environmental awareness of its siting, meaning that North Carolina facility -- the same one that will stream iTunes to your iOS device soon -- is smack dab in the middle of what Greenpeace calls the "dirty data triangle." Google and Facebook also have facilities on that grid, which is made up of only about 5 per cent clean energy, with the rest coming from either coal (62 per cent) or nuclear (32 per cent).

Greenpeace's report wasn't all condemnation, though. The organization did say, essentially, that Apple was "getting better." Plus the data collected for the report didn't come directly from the companies under scrutiny, as there is no law in the U.S. requiring that. The report drew publicly available information on "recent investments of select brands and current clean energy supply associated with each investment," and from there, matched that information with data from the government or utilities.

Still, nobody likes getting an F.

Join the CIO Australia group on LinkedIn. The group is open to CIOs, IT Directors, COOs, CTOs and senior IT managers.

Join the newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags ApplelaptopsGreen technologyGreenpeaceenvironment

More about Amazon Web ServicesAppleFacebookGoogleHewlett-Packard AustraliaHPMicrosoftYahoo

Show Comments

Market Place