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RMIT launches Games and Experimental Entertainment Lab

RMIT launches Games and Experimental Entertainment Lab

Team to make non-traditional media more like video games

The Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) is this month launching the Games and Experimental Entertainment Laboratory (GEELab) in an effort to drive innovation in the games, entertainment and creative media industries.

GEELab director, Dr Steffen P. Walz, said he hoped the lab will provide a vision for the future of entertainment and work closely with the IT industry to do this.

“As an engine of entertainment, media and Internet innovation, the GEELab will focus on next-generation entertainment visions and will work closely with industry to model the gaming prototypes of the future,” Dr Walz said.

“Researchers will work to ‘gamify’ traditionally non-linear media such as TV, film and radio, creating new design strategies, narratives and service prototypes.”

The GEELab will be headquartered in Melbourne, with deputy vice-chancellor of research and innovation, Professor Daine Alcorn, saying that the program will build upon the connections already made within the IT industry and community.

“By building on RMIT’s strong industry links and our connections with international game research institutions, GEELab will further our efforts to support practical research solutions for transforming the future,” Alcorn said.

The program is set to be launched on 15 March with a symposium at RMIT’s Storey Hall with speakers including Gabe Zichermann and Professor Dr Zhao Chen Ding.

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Tags entertainmentvideo gamesRMITGames and Experimental Entertainment Laboratory (GEELab)Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT)

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