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How to Manage Project Risks, Part 6: Project Delivery Risks

How to Manage Project Risks, Part 6: Project Delivery Risks

Project Delivery risks can change during the project, so risk assessment needs to not only identify the current risk situation but also the target risk situation

There are a series of 8 systemic or common risks to the successful delivery of any project that should be formally considered, evaluated and, where necessary, action taken.

A key aspect of these risks is that they can change during the project so that the risk assessment needs to not only identify the current risk situation but also the target risk situation.

Systemic Project Delivery Risks are proscribed - each risk has four alternative risk levels. Your project team can then select the risk level description that best fits your project's current status. You can also select the risk level description that best fits your target situation or level of risk (which may not be fully mitigated).

Action plans to move from the current to the desired future risk state can then be developed, approved and actioned.

Progress towards achieving the target risk level can then be reported against a scheduled risk management action plan.

All pretty standard stuff, except that it is rarely done.

The provision of proscribed standard risk options allows all projects' Project Delivery Risks to be compared as they all potentially have the same risks. To see how this risk profiling tool works, go to www.manageyourprojectprofile.com.

The standard systemic project delivery risks cover:

1. Business requirements How well are the business requirements known and stable?
2. Design skills Do we have the requisite skills to design the solution?
3. Development skills Do we have the requisite skills to develop and implement the solution?
4. Technical risk Are we dealing with known or new technologies?
5. Business knowledge How well does the project team understand the business and its issues?
6. Client risk Has this project team worked with this Sponsor/business before?
7. Timescale risk How long is the project's duration (allowing, therefore, the time for requirements to change)?
8. Failure risk What is the business consequence if this project failed?

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