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  • Be prepared for the breach that's headed your way

    January 2015 is already winding down, but it's not too late to think about the lessons of 2014. For anyone in information security, 2014 was a year marked by spectacular breaches. It ended with Sony Pictures Entertainment getting its clock cleaned by hackers, quite possibly from North Korea. Wouldn't it be great if 2015 doesn't include the same sort of clock cleaning at your company?

  • Facebook, take note!

    In the last few weeks it's possible some of your Facebook chums posted messages on their walls in which they tried to revoke permission for the social network to use and distribute content they post.

  • Let's not make patent trolls stronger

    As you can tell by the name we've given them, patent trolls aren't popular critters. The game these operators play is shady and sleazy, bordering on extortion -- though it's completely legal. What they do is to purchase patents, with no intention of using or selling them, but rather to shake down as many people as possible by accusing them of violating the patent, even if the patent troll has no reason to believe that.

  • Sony hack: Never underestimate the stupidity of criminals

    So who was really behind the Sony hack? And does it really matter?

  • Sony and Chase: Don't blame the CISO

    Over the last couple of weeks, I have read numerous news stories about the widely publicized security breaches at Sony and JPMorgan Chase. It seems as if everybody is a Monday-morning quarterback, with every other reporter voicing an opinion on how these breaches should have been prevented. In particular, I read two articles that specifically blamed the information security organizations at those companies for failing to properly stop the attackers. That's not fair.

  • Hold the phone, McDonald's

    Mobile payments are supposed to be fast, easy and convenient. I knew when I pulled up at a McDonald's drive-through window the other day that the fast food giant's implementation of Apple Pay challenged. I just didn't know challenged it would be.

  • We can learn from the Sony hack

    Well that stinks, doesn't it? Sony Pictures goes and scrubs the launch of a $44 million movie after being hacked, potentially by North Korea. Almost reads more like a James Bond plot than a news story, but there it is. And this time, it doesn't seem likely that Bond, James Bond, is going to show up at the eleventh hour to save the day.

  • Why <i>The Interview</i> won't play in Peoria -- for now

    Maybe I should be outraged by Sony's decision not to distribute the movie The Interview, but I am merely saddened by it. I am saddened that a hacking incident with all the hallmarks of a simple case of extortion has been distorted so it looks like a terrorist threat.

  • Getting real about information governance

    An enterprise information governance (IG) program is supposed to help organizations reduce costs and risk while improving access to valuable information, but most mature enterprises find the idea of implementing such a program to be daunting. It doesn't have to be. By understanding the true value to the enterprise of information assets, and by taking a simple, step-by-step approach to making the necessary changes, effective IG can become a reality.

  • Intelligence community must get its own house in order

    Earlier this month, Robert Hannigan, the director of GCHQ, a British intelligence agency, wrote an opinion piece in the Financial Times castigating tech companies for being "in denial" about abuses of their platforms by criminals and terrorists and calling on them to develop better arrangements for facilitating lawful government investigations. While there is certainly much room for improved cooperation between government and the private sector, the first step for reform should be for intelligence agencies like GCHQ to take a hard look in the mirror.

  • What happens next in the Cisco suit against Arista?

    Arista Networks' stock took it on the chin when Cisco slapped the company with patent infringement and copyright law suits last Friday, losing almost 20% of its value at one point as investors and others mulled the long term implications of the suits.

  • Microsoft's Latest Buy, Acompli, is a Great Email App

    Microsoft this week announced it had acquired Acompli, an email and calendar integration app for Android and iOS. Re/code reports that Microsoft paid "north of $200 million," a far cry from Facebook's nearly $19 billion buyout of messaging app WhatsApp.

  • Network security needs big data

    There are two types of organization now: those that have been breached, and those that just don't know it yet.

  • Top 10 tech industry megatrends of 2015

    "Futurology has always bounced around between common sense, nonsense and a healthy dose of wishful thinking." That's how a 2012 Scientific American article summed up the history of prediction. Our compelling annual urge to predict the future traces back to the ancient Greeks and their Delphic Oracle--so who am I to argue with such venerable tradition? Here's my top 10 countdown for the shape of our industry in 2015:

  • Getting your board's buy-in on cybersecurity

    High-profile data breaches continue to make news, and you can bet that your board of directors has noticed. Breaches can result in huge remediation costs, litigation and lost revenues resulting from a damaged reputation. Board members pay attention to those things.

  • Why You Shouldn't Shop for Deals on Thanksgiving

    How you choose to spend your free time is up to you. If you choose to spend part of Thanksgiving Day shopping at a big retail or consumer electronics store, however, you'll be giving in to an ugly trend that's spoiling the holiday for millions of relatively low-paid employees who are forced to work.

  • Snapchat, Whisper Promise Privacy but Fail (Miserably) to Deliver

    Social media apps that promise ephemeral communications or true anonymity frequently fail to live up to all meaningful expectations.

  • Why You Really Shouldn't Worry About In-Store Beacons

    When it comes to wireless tracking and electronic spying, paranoia is often the right response. Not always, though. Case in point: The rather hysterical flap over beacons, which use Bluetooth technology to detect nearby mobile devices and deliver advertisements and other related content. You'd think the little devices were something out of a sci-fi movie, ready to track your every move and send the data to the Dark Powers that be.

  • Silicon Valley's next disruption: Reality!

    We're right on the edge of dual revolutions in artificial reality and augmented reality. It's an exciting time because we're in the final days of a world in which these technologies are considered "futuristic." By next year, early adopters will have them in their homes. Within three years they'll be mainstream.

  • HBO Will Make it Easier to Cut the Cable Cord

    Love HBO, but hate your cable company? Listen up.