Critical.
Authoritative.
Strategic.
Subscribe to CIO Magazine »

Security » Opinions »

  • What to know after the latest patent ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court

    The Alice ruling clarifies patent-eligible software processes.

  • The hidden dangers of "good enough" authentication

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • Solidifying Microsoft Azure Security for SharePoint and SQL in the Cloud

    More and more organizations are moving SharePoint and SQL workloads into Microsoft Azure in the cloud because of the simplicity of spinning up servers in the cloud, adding more capacity, decreasing capacity without having to BUY servers on-premise. What used to cost organizations $20,000, $50,000, or more in purchasing servers, storage, network bandwidth, replica disaster recovery sites, etc and delay SharePoint and SQL rollouts by weeks or month is now completely managed by spinning up virtual machines up in Azure and customizing and configuring systems in the Cloud.

  • 'Privacy Badger' Browser Add-On Protects You from Online Tracking

    I'd never confuse Amazon, Facebook or doubleClick with the NSA, but I still don't like being tracked online. Tracking is more than just annoying; it lets unscrupulous companies that scarf up user data turn around and sell your information -- and despite statements to the contrary, the collection isn't always done anonymously.

  • Dumping an open source Honeypot on Rachel: FTC reloads on liquidating robocallers

    The Federal Trade Commission today announced the rules for its second robocall exterminating challenge, known this time as Zapping Rachel Robocall Contest. "Rachel From Cardholder Services," was a large robocall scam the agency took out in 2012.

  • Apple's partnership with IBM leaves CIOs hanging

    The big news this week of Apple and IBM joining forces to dominate the mobile enterprise market makes a great story - at least on the surface.

  • Kenneth van Wyk: We can't just blame users

    Yes, users sometimes do stupid things. Some always will. But developers need to do more to save users from themselves.

  • Security Manager's Journal: Trapped: Building access controls go kablooey

    Doors just stop working when one old PC in a storage closet dies.

  • Facebook is a school yard bully that's going down

    Facebook has grown and evolved in recent years. In addition to connecting people online, it bombards users with unnecessary ads and useless sponsored stories. And it runs experiments on its users. Columnist Alex Burinskiy is not amused.

  • Evan Schuman: What if you can't trust your inbox?

    Goldman Sachs is taking Google to court to force the cloud vendor to delete an email accidentally sent to a Gmail user. The consequences of a ruling for Goldman would be devastating.

  • 5 things you no longer need to do for mobile security

    A couple of years ago companies were dismissive of BYOD, but as they've realized that the horse left the stable, they are adopting policies and next generation technologies to help manage BYOD. They also recognize that successful mobile security requires a cooperative partnership with employees, so are working with them to determine what policy works best for both parties, allowing BYOD to become part of the enterprise mobile security framework.

  • Board of directors will have a profound impact on cybersecurity

    According to a recent article in the Wall Street Journal, corporate boards are getting much more involved in cybersecurity. What's driving this behavior? While the Target breach probably influenced this behavior, corporate boards now realize that cybersecurity has become a pervasive risk that could have an adverse impact on all businesses.

  • Facebook's icky psychology experiment is actually business as usual

    Unless you've been living under a rock for the last couple weeks, you've no doubt heard about Facebook's creepy, secret, psychological experiment designed to see if negative newsfeed posts inspire more negativity -- and vice versa. I don't want to excuse Facebook's behavior, which has prompted a (sort-of) apology from Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, as well as an ongoing stream of condemnation and outrage from legitimate psychologists and Internet commentators. I too was weirded out by the revelations, feeling manipulated and that somehow my privacy had been unfairly invaded without my permission.

  • Microsoft hammers No-IP, collateral damage includes Hacking Team's legal malware

    Microsoft brought the hammer down on No-IP and seized 22 of their domains. They also filed a civil case against "Mohamed Benabdellah and Naser Al Mutairi, and a U.S. company, Vitalwerks Internet Solutions, LLC (doing business as No-IP.com), for their roles in creating, controlling, and assisting in infecting millions of computers with malicious software--harming Microsoft, its customers and the public at large."

  • PayPal locks out ProtonMail, asks if encrypted email service has government approval

    We previously looked at the huge demand for ProtonMail, an easy-to-use and free NSA-proof email service created by CERN and MIT scientists. It is based in Switzerland, meaning the U.S. government can't just hoover it up without an enforceable Swiss court order, which is hard to come by since the Swiss legal system has "strong privacy protections." The demand for the end-to-end encrypted email service was so high that ProtonMail ran out of a month's worth of server capacity in three days.

  • Big data security analytics mantra: Collect and analyze everything

    In a recent research survey, ESG asked security professionals to identify the most important type of data for use in malware detection and analysis (note: I am an employee of ESG). The responses were as follows:

  • The Danger of Google's Development Cadence

    Instead of updating products every six weeks, as Google promised at the I/O developer conference, the company might want to slow down and make sure its products and services actually represent what its customers want.

  • SCOTUS: 'Privacy comes at a cost' but ‘get a warrant' before searching that phone

    In huge win for digital privacy that will help pave the future of the Fourth Amendment, the Supreme Court unanimously ruled that Johnny Law needs a warrant before he can search the cellphone a person he arrested.

  • Revisiting Comcast's Xfinity public hotspot strategy

    Last week I wrote about Comcast's plan to build the nation's biggest Wi-Fi service by co-opting their customers' Xfinity gateways and, following a detailed conversation with a representative from Comcast's Corporate Communications group, I have some corrections to make and quite a few additional concerns to add.

  • Supreme Court goes 1 for 2 on big tech decisions

    Wednesday was a big day for technology cases in the Supreme Court. The Justices ruled on a pair of important cases that promise to have wide-ranging implications for the development and use of modern technology for years and decades to come. But the effects of the decisions aren't necessarily what either side in the cases has been arguing.

Computerworld
ARN
Techworld
CMO