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  • What we know about North Korea's cyberarmy

    The attack on Sony Pictures has put North Korea's cyberwarfare program in the spotlight. Like most of the internal workings of the country, not much is known but snippets of information have come out over the years, often through defectors and intelligence leaks.

  • Cyberattack on German steel factory causes 'massive damage'

    A German steel factory suffered massive damage after hackers managed to access production networks, allowing them to tamper with the controls of a blast furnace, the government said in its annual IT security report.

  • Microsoft files suit against alleged tech support scammers

    Microsoft is finally cracking down on scammers who offer to fix non-existent computer problems for hundreds of dollars. In a first strike, Microsoft sued several U.S. companies it said are involved in fake tech support scams.

  • Critical vulnerability in Git clients puts developers at risk

    A critical vulnerability in client software used to interact with Git, a distributed revision control system for managing source code repositories, allows attackers to execute rogue commands on computers used by developers.

  • Think North Korea hacked Sony? Think about this

    North Korea or not? There's still a lot we don't know about the attack on Sony Pictures and those behind it.

  • The 'grinch' isn't a Linux vulnerability, Red Hat says

    The "grinch" Linux vulnerability that Alert Logic raised alarms about Tuesday is not a vulnerability at all, according to Red Hat.

  • Driver's license app on a smartphone raises privacy issues

    A smartphone app that drivers in Iowa will be able to use as an official driver's license could lead to privacy abuses by law enforcement.

  • Worst security breaches of the year 2014: Sony tops the list

    As 2014 winds down, the breach of Sony Pictures Entertainment is clearly the biggest data breach of the year and among the most devastating to any corporation ever.

  • Vulnerability in embedded Web server exposes millions of routers to hacking

    A serious vulnerability in an embedded Web server used by many router models from different manufacturers allows remote attackers to take control of affected devices over the Internet.

  • Uber driver in Boston area faces rape charges

    An Uber driver in the Boston area is facing rape and other charges for allegedly beating and sexually assaulting a passenger earlier this month.

  • Sony hit with second employee lawsuit over hack

    Sony Pictures has been hit by a second lawsuit alleging it didn't do enough to safeguard the personal information of employees that was lost in a major hack in late November.

  • Point-of-sale malware creators still in business with Spark, an Alina spinoff

    A malware program dubbed Spark that steals payment card data from compromised point-of-sale (POS) systems is likely a modification of an older Trojan called Alina, and highlights a continuing, lucrative business for cybercriminals.

  • Microsoft nixes EU browser ballot screen

    Microsoft has pulled the plug on the browser ballot screen it was forced to display in the aftermath of a threat by the European Union's antitrust agency five years ago.

  • U.S.-Cuba breakthrough is no slam dunk for Internet

    The Obama administration's historic move to restore ties between the U.S. and Cuba may eventually put more Cubans online, but the future of the Internet there is likely to depend more on domestic policies than on imported goods and services.

  • U.S. on Sony breach: North Korea did it

    U.S. officials now believe North Korea is behind the attack that took down Sony Pictures Entertainment's computer network and posted contents on the Internet, but the government hasn't decided whether to formally accuse the country of carrying out the hack, according to The New York Times.

  • Microsoft kills EU browser choice screen

    Microsoft has retired the browser choice screen it agreed to show new Windows users in the European Union as part of an antitrust settlement.

  • Sony cancels 'The Interview' release after threats following cyberattack

    Sony Pictures on Wednesday canceled the Dec. 25 release of its controversial comedy, "The Interview," after theater chains decided not to play the film following terrorist threats after a cyber attack.

  • Forensic software gets around iCloud security features

    A Russian software company has updated its forensic software to work-around the security features Apple recently added to iCloud and increased what information can be extracted from the cloud storage service.

  • Obama pushes for net neutrality, opposes data localization in trade pact

    President Barack Obama's administration is pushing two potentially controversial Internet policies in a secretive trade pact, with trade negotiators calling for other countries to adopt net neutrality provisions while rejecting policies requiring local storage of data in a secretive 50-country trade pact now being negotiated.

  • Chinese Android phone maker hides secret backdoor on its devices

    Chinese smartphone maker Coolpad has built an extensive "backdoor" into its Android devices that can track users, serve them unwanted advertisements and install unauthorized apps, a U.S. security firm alleged today.