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  • The ratings: Most net neutrality groups get poor grades for funding transparency

    After a spate of news stories about alleged "astroturf" advocacy in a contentious U.S. net neutrality debate, the IDG News Service looked into the funding transparency of several think tanks and advocacy groups involved in the issue. Several disclose limited or no information about their funding, we found.

  • Advocacy groups accused of obscuring corporate ties in net neutrality debate

    A spate of recent news stories have revealed that a wide variety of lobby groups have financial ties to broadband carriers and trade associations, accusing them of faking grassroots opposition to strong net neutrality rules.

  • Secretive funding fuels ongoing net neutrality astroturfing controversy

    The contentious debate about net neutrality in the U.S. has sparked controversy over a lack of funding transparency for advocacy groups and think tanks, which critics say subverts the political process.

  • Court shuts down alleged PC tech support scam

    A court has shut down a New York tech support vendor after the U.S. Federal Trade Commission accused the company of scamming computer users into paying hundreds of dollars for services they did not need.

  • New material could lead to longer-lasting batteries

    Researchers have taken a step forward in developing batteries that can store 10 times more energy than existing lithium-ion batteries.

  • Senator wants Whisper to explain how it tracks users, shares their data

    Social media app Whisper, a supposedly anonymous way for users to post online confessions, is now facing privacy questions from a U.S. senator after reports that it tracks locations of users and has shared their information with other companies.

  • The 'Backoff' malware linked to data breaches is spreading

    The number of computers in North America infected by the Backoff malware, which is blamed for a string of payment card breaches, has risen sharply, according to research from network security company Damballa.

  • Automation arrives at restaurants (but don't blame rising minimum wages)

    McDonald's this week told financial analysts of its plans to install self-ordering kiosks and mobile ordering at its restaurants. It isn't the only food chain doing this.

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    Cyberespionage group launches sophisticated phishing attacks against Outlook Web App users

    A cyberespionage group has been using advanced spear-phishing techniques to steal email log-in credentials from the employees of military agencies, embassies, defense contractors and international media outlets that use Office 365's Outlook Web App.

  • Adobe begins encrypting user data collected from Digital Editions app

    Adobe Systems said it is now encrypting data it collects about certain e-books after facing criticism earlier this month for not protecting the data.

  • Demand for iOS devices helps drive enterprise mobility strategy

    Companies transitioning to iOS devices as part of a CYOD program can expect a suspicious number of “wet BlackBerries” turned in, according to AirWatch's A/NZ chief Rob Roe.

  • Apple Pay's next move could be phone-to-phone payments

    The launch this week of Apple Pay is giving many people their first taste of NFC payment technology, which allows them to buy things in a store by bringing an iPhone 6 close to a compatible terminal.

  • Facebook and Yahoo prevent use of recycled email addresses to hijack accounts

    Facebook and Yahoo have developed a mechanism to prevent the owners of recycled email addresses from hijacking accounts that were registered on other sites using those addresses in the past.

  • Akamai sees record-setting spikes in size and volume of DDoS attacks

    The size and volume of distributed denial-of-service attacks has exploded in the past year, with a 389 percent increase in average attack bandwidth between the third quarter of 2013 and the third quarter of 2014, according to an Internet security report from Akamai Technologies.

  • Wearable health devices are a novelty that will wear off

    Once the novelty wears off, people abandon their health wearable devices, many of which require regular syncing, powering up and other steps needed to keep them running.

  • German publishers capitulate and let Google post news snippets -- for now

    German publishers said they are bowing to Google's market power, and will allow the search engine powerhouse to show news snippets in search results free of charge, at least for the time being.

  • Abandoned subdomains pose security risk for businesses

    Many companies set up subdomains for use with external services, but then forget to disable them when they stop using those services, creating a loophole for attackers to exploit.

  • 4 Security Tips for Apple Pay Users

    Many security experts agree that Apple Pay and contactless payment systems like it are an improvement over traditional credit-card based systems. However, Apple Pay is still new and relatively untested, and it's wise to approach it strategically.

  • Security, Payments Experts Talk Apple Pay

    You've likely heard that Apple took its first steps into the mobile payments industry this week with the launch of its Apple Pay NFC-based, contactless payment service.

  • Australian ISP stands up to filmmakers hunting pirates

    The producer of Oscar-winning film, Dallas Buyers Club, has taken its hunt for pirates of the film to Australia, after filing a barrage of antipiracy lawsuits in the US. But at least one Australian Internet service provider is pushing back out of concern that the movie producer aims to intimidate its customers into paying excessive damages.