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  • Fujitsu tech can track heavily blurred people in security videos

    Fujitsu has developed image-processing technology that can be used to track people in security camera footage, even when the images are heavily blurred to protect their privacy.

  • VMware sued for alleged GPL licence infractions

    A Linux kernel developer is suing VMware in Germany, alleging the company has not complied with copyright terms for using open-source software.

  • Mandarin Oriental removes malware after payment card breach

    Luxury hotelier Mandarin Oriental has removed malicious software that was used to steal credit card data from some of its hotels in the U.S. and Europe, the company said Thursday.

  • Lawmakers target data brokers in privacy bill

    Four U.S. senators have resurrected legislation that would allow consumers to see and correct personal information held by data brokers and tell those businesses to stop sharing or selling it for marketing purposes.

  • Adobe invites help hunting vulnerabilities in its online services

    Adobe Systems launched a new program that encourages security researchers to find and report vulnerabilities in the company's websites and other online services.

  • OpenDNS trials system that quickly detects computer crime

    A security system undergoing testing by a San-Francisco-based company aims to speed up the detection of websites and domains used for cybercrime.

  • No reduced tax rate for e-books, top EU court rules

    E-books must be subject to the full rate of value-added tax (VAT), and European Union countries may not extend tax exemptions for books to include e-books, the EU's highest court ruled Thursday, adding that it considers downloadable e-books to be services.

  • Five things we learned about Etsy from its IPO filing

    Etsy, the online marketplace for buying and selling handmade goods and crafts, disclosed some interesting tidbits about the company's business when it filed to go public Wednesday.

  • Time to FREAK out? How to tell if you're vulnerable

    Nervous about the FREAK flaw? Freakin' out?

  • NTIA to push for drone privacy standards

    The U.S. National Telecommunications and Information Administration plans to host a series of meetings with interested people aimed at developing best practices for protecting privacy in the burgeoning aerial drone industry.

  • MWC 2015: Galaxy S6 and Edge feature plums for workers and IT shops

    BARCELONA: With the Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 Edge, Samsung is making a concerted effort to attract workers as potential buyers and to win the hearts of IT managers who have to wrangle with enterprise smartphone security and management.

  • FTC targets group that sends out millions of robocalls a day

    Given the amount of time the FTC and others have put into curing the robocall problem, it is disheartening to hear that a group of companies for almost a year have been making billions of illegal robocalls.

  • EU countries agree on watered-down roaming and net neutrality plans

    European Union countries have proposed keeping roaming charges around at least until mid-2018, going against proposals from the European Parliament and Commission for their all-out abolition by the end of the year.

  • China says new cybersurveillance proposal follows US security practices

    China is scratching its head over why the U.S. is opposing a new anti-terror law relating to cybersurveillance when the U.S. and other countries have also requested that tech companies hand over data to help stop terrorists.

  • Apple in settlement talks with car battery maker A123 Systems

    Apple is in talks to settle a lawsuit filed by electric-car battery maker A123 Systems, which has charged the iPhone maker with poaching five of its employees to set up a new battery division.

  • Judge says $415 million settlement in Silicon Valley hiring case is 'substantial'

    A judge has approved a US$415 million settlement in a Silicon Valley employee hiring case, calling the amount "substantial" to settle claims that Apple, Google, Adobe Systems and Intel conspired not to hire each other's workers.

  • Drive-by attack relies on hacked GoDaddy accounts

    Hundreds of hacked domain name accounts registered through GoDaddy are being used as part of a highly effective campaign using the Angler exploit kit to infect computers with malware.

  • FREAK is another serious flaw in the Web's encryption

    Experts are warning of a serious security flaw that has apparently gone undetected for years and can weaken encrypted connections between computers and websites, potentially undermining security across the Internet.

  • Snowden willing to face trial in US, if it's fair

    Edward Snowden, the former U.S. National Security Agency contractor who leaked details of the agency's surveillance programs, is willing to return to the U.S. and face criminal charges, if he's assured of a fair trial, according to a Russian news report.

  • Privacy advocates find Obama proposal lacking

    A consumer privacy proposal from U.S. President Barack Obama's administration gives people too little control over their personal data and companies too much latitude to use that information, a coalition of 14 privacy and digital rights groups said.

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