Critical.
Authoritative.
Strategic.
Subscribe to CIO Magazine »

Security » News »

  • NSA reform bill stalled with Congress headed toward fall recess

    The U.S. Congress is unlikely to pass legislation to end the National Security Agency's widespread collection of U.S. telephone records before leaving Washington, D.C., on a two-month break.

  • Lyft car-pooling opens in LA despite regulatory challenge

    Lyft is bringing its car-pooling service to Los Angeles, even while California regulators say it's illegal.

  • Browser vulnerability caps rough few months for Android security

    It has been a summer of discontent for the Android security community, as a host of vulnerabilities large and small has arisen to plague the world's most popular mobile OS. The revelation this week of a cross-site scripting flaw in the default browser installed on large numbers of pre-version 4.4 Android devices is merely the latest entry in a list that makes for unsettling reading.

  • US court throws out $368.2 million patent award against Apple

    A U.S. appeals court has thrown out a US$368.2 million award against Apple in a patent infringement case brought by patent-holding and software company VirnetX.

  • Is a Remote-Wipe Policy a Crude Approach to BYOD Security?

    It's a good bet the Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policy your employees mindlessly signed gives the right to remotely wipe their lost or stolen phone or tablet. It's an even better bet that they're not OK with it.

  • Subway to accept NFC payments starting in October

    Subway will soon allow customers to pay for their sandwiches with the tap of a smartphone.

  • German court lifts countrywide ban on UberPop

    The Frankfurt Regional Court has lifted a nationwide preliminary ban on Uber Technologies' ride-sharing service UberPop, ruling that there is no urgent need for an emergency ban.

  • Cisco gains strength in next-gen firewalls via Sourcefire code

    Cisco is bringing technology obtained through last year's acquisition of Sourcefire to its firewalls to enable threat-focused security for enterprises.

  • Today's Security Hacks Are After More Than Bank Info

    The beat goes on. In recent weeks, both JP Morgan Chase and Home Depot have been identified as the latest victims of large-scale cyberattacks.

  • Many Android devices vulnerable to session hijacking through the default browser

    The default browser in Android versions older than 4.4 has a vulnerability that allows malicious websites to bypass a critical security mechanism and take control of a user's authenticated sessions on other sites.

  • Apple Watch under scrutiny for privacy by Connecticut attorney general

    The attorney general of the U.S. state of Connecticut is concerned about the privacy implications of Apple Watch's handling of consumers' health information.

  • 'Tiny banker' malware targets US financial institutions

    A banking trojan, known for its small size but powerful capabilities, has expanded the number of financial institutions it can collect data from, according to security vendor Avast.

  • Data loss detection tool mines the ephemeral world of 'pastes'

    It's not easy to figure out if your data has been collected by hackers, but an online tool has been expanded to hunt through one of the most prolific sources of leaked data, known as "pastes."

  • Facebook open sources its mcrouter data-caching tool

    Facebook is releasing mcrouter, its software for turning many cache servers around the world into one distributed system, as open source.

  • Google reports a 19% jump in US government data requests

    Google fielded 19 percent more requests from the U.S. government for data on its users in the first half of this year compared to the second half of last year, the company said Monday.

  • Yahoo slams new 'digital will' law in US, says users have privacy when they die

    What should happen to your personal digital communications -- emails, chats, photos and the like -- after you die? Should they be treated like physical letters for the purposes of a will?

  • FTC warns of using big data to exclude consumers

    The collection and analysis of big data holds great promise, but may also lead some companies to create profiles of consumers leading to discrimination, the chairwoman of the U.S. Federal Trade Commission said Monday.

  • Open-source project promises easy-to-use encryption for email, instant messaging and more

    A software development project launched Monday aims to create free tools that simplify the encryption of online forms of communication like email, instant messaging, SMS and more by solving the complexity associated with the exchange and management of encryption keys.

  • How network virtualization is used as a security tool

    When people think of network virtualization, the advantages that come to mind typically include faster provisioning of networks, easier management of networks and more efficient use of resources. But network virtualization can have another major benefit as well: security.

  • How Boston Children's Hospital Hit Back at Anonymous

    On March 20, Dr. Daniel J. Nigrin, senior vice president for information services and CIO at Boston Children's Hospital, got word that his organization faced an imminent threat from Anonymous in response to the hospital's diagnosis and treatment of a 15-year-old girl removed from her parent's care by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Computerworld
ARN
Techworld
CMO