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  • Information overload, SIEM version

    It's been over a year since I last wrote about my security information and event management (SIEM) platform -- and a lot has happened since then. Back then, I wrote, "Now that my SIEM has been in operation for several months, I've become completely dependent on it, not only for security monitoring, but also for overall awareness of my network."

  • 11 Tips for Improving Your Company's Customer Support

    Companies spend tens of thousands of dollars (or more) promoting their brand, trying to create a positive image. Yet often they treat customer support, which can be a customer's first point of contact with the company, as a necessary evil. Many businesses make it difficult for customers to get the help they need -- creating a negative impression.

  • Is Your Security Software Sitting Unused on the Shelf?

    When a company invests thousands of dollars in security software, you'd expected the product to be used to protect the company.

  • What does the FCC's net neutrality vote mean?

    Net neutrality has been debated for a decade, but the Federal Communications Commission's historic vote on Thursday signals only the beginning of further battles and likely lawsuits.

  • Is LinkedIn Killing the Traditional Resume?

    The days of the traditional one-page resume may be numbered, but it's still not quite time to ditch those well-crafted, battle-tested documents. Recruiters and career development consultants say the resume is not dead; however, the LinkedIn profile has surpassed it in terms of importance to modern job seekers.

  • Premier 100 IT Leader: Deanna Wise

    Deanna Wise says her Midwest upbringing taught her to "do what you say you're going to do." So when the 45-year-old CIO committed to leading Dignity Health through a five-year, $1.8 billion deployment of its electronic health records system -- the single most strategic business initiative driving the organization -- she couldn't disappoint the people who were counting on her.

  • Premier 100 IT Leader: Kathy Fuertes

    Kathy Fuertes knows investment management firm Vanguard inside and out, having spent 17 years there in several IT roles before taking the helm of the Institutional Systems team in January 2013. So when Vanguard's Institutional Investment Group devised a multiyear technology program to help transform its business, she knew what to do.

  • Premier 100 IT Leader: Gerry McCartney

    Purdue University wants its students to succeed, and it's using big data to make that happen.

  • Browser fingerprints, and why they are so hard to erase

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • President's cyber security summit: Share attack info but protect privacy, civil liberties

    Participants in the White House Summit on Cybersecurity and Consumer Protection on Friday called for government/private sector information sharing, updated regulations, and improving the trust citizens have in the government's respect for privacy and civil liberties.

  • Awareness on the cheap

    You don't have to spend a lot of money on some information security initiatives. Take security awareness, for example. You can get huge returns with small investments.

  • Security Manager's Journal: Breaches are everywhere

    Follow me, if you will, on a journey back in time to just one year ago. As 2013 turned into 2014, the information security industry was buzzing about the latest spate of breaches. Target had ushered in a new era of retail security breaches, with 40 million card numbers lost to the hackers. Little did we know at the time that this was just the beginning, and small potatoes in comparison to what was to come. One year ago, Neiman Marcus and Michaels had joined Target, and I wrote in response to the growing number of breach disclosures that "in fact, I have to wonder which retailers have not suffered breaches. The word on the street is that at least a half-dozen other retailers were compromised in the past few months, without publicity." Sadly, this turned out to be true. I hate being right all the time.

  • NSA approves Samsung and Boeing mobile devices for employee use

    As part of the NSA's program to certify commercial off-the-shelf technology for use inside the agency, mobile devices from Samsung and Boeing have been cleared for use by NSA employees.

  • Breaches are a personal nightmare for corporate security pros

    Beyond the compromise of valuable information, loss of revenues and damage to brand reputation, data breaches can pose a threat to the careers of security professionals involved: witness the sudden departures of both the CEO and the CIO of Target after last year's compromise of 40 million customers' credit cards.

  • Lessons from the Sony breach in risk management and business resiliency

    2014 made it clear that cybercrime affects everyone. From retailers to banks, consumer goods companies and health care, there isn't an industry left untouched by cybercriminals looking to disrupt, steal or embarrass. So what has to change? The recent Sony attack and countless other examples point to the need for board members and executives to consider cybersecurity under the concept of risk management and business resilience.

  • Will enhanced servers do away with need for switches?

    As more and more servers are virtualized, connections between them are increasingly handled by virtual switches running on the same servers, begging the question, does the top of rack data center network switchultimately get subsumed into the server?

  • Frequently asked questions about the North Korean Internet incident

    News of North Korea's Internet outage was widely covered in the media on Monday of this week, and while a number of questions remain about what happened and who was responsible, speculation has it that North Korea was hit by a DDoS attach."

  • The Sony breach may be start of new nation-state cyberattack

    It has been an exceptional year for IT security breaches, which have become part of an escalating trend in destructive attacks. And they're going to get worse.

  • iWARP update advances RDMA over Ethernet for data center and cloud networks

    The challenge for data center operators selecting a high performance transport technology for their network is striking the ideal balance between acquisition, deployment and management costs, and support for high performance capabilities such as the remote direct memory access (RDMA) protocol.

  • BYOD brings corporate contradictions

    During a roundtable discussion on the Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) trend, a tech leader candidly offered this bit of real-world insight: "My wife is a nurse. There is no BYOD policy at the hospital. But all of the nurses communicate with each other via SMS, because that's the most efficient way to do their job."

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