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  • iWARP update advances RDMA over Ethernet for data center and cloud networks

    The challenge for data center operators selecting a high performance transport technology for their network is striking the ideal balance between acquisition, deployment and management costs, and support for high performance capabilities such as the remote direct memory access (RDMA) protocol.

  • BYOD brings corporate contradictions

    During a roundtable discussion on the Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) trend, a tech leader candidly offered this bit of real-world insight: "My wife is a nurse. There is no BYOD policy at the hospital. But all of the nurses communicate with each other via SMS, because that's the most efficient way to do their job."

  • How 'Facebook at Work' Could Alter the Social Enterprise Landscape

    Most people don't want to be caught at work with Facebook open on their computers or smartphones, but that may change very soon. Facebook is working on a new social network for the workplace, called "Facebook at Work," that would pit the king of social media against more business-savvy stalwarts such as Google, Microsoft and LinkedIn, according to the Financial Times.

  • How Twitter Helps 'Serial' Podcast Grow Its Audience

    Twitter's director of ad research wants to piggyback on the surprising success of the weekly "Serial" podcast to illustrate his company's capability to amplify even the "oldest form of electronic media."

  • Why AT&T and Sprint just announced business conferencing services

    Separate announcements Tuesday for business conferencing services, one from AT&T and the other from Sprint, highlight the radically changing business models at U.S. wireless carriers.

  • Privacy is the new killer app

    A funny thing is happening in the wake of the Edward Snowden NSA revelations, the infamous iCloud hack of celebrity nude photos, and the hit parade of customer data breaches at Target, Home Depot and the U.S. Postal Service. If it's not the government looking at your data, it's bored, lonely teenagers from the Internet or credit card fraudsters.

  • Snapchat Says Its Weaknesses Are Actually Strengths for Advertisers

    Snapchat just recently started to include advertisements in its popular ephemeral messaging app, but its advertising strategy is notably different than its competitors' strategies. Snapchat says it has no interest in tricking its users into clicking ads by blurring the line between advertising and organic content created by actual users.

  • Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter Earnings Tell Very Different Tales

    Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn all recently announced their latest earnings, and the reports highlight profound differences in each of the platforms, as well as unique future opportunities. The companies, operators of three of the world's largest and most popular social networks, may be competitors, but when you enter their walled gardens the purpose and intent is increasingly varied.

  • 6 things Galaxy Note 4 does that iPhone 6 can't

    I'm a two-smartphone kind of guy. My current smartphones of choice: The Samsung Galaxy Note 4 and Apple iPhone 6.

  • Federal IT Leaders Look for Trust, Transparency in Cloud Vendors

    Even as federal agencies have been warming to the opportunities that commercial cloud service providers can offer, the transition is gradual, as government IT officials continue to express concerns about service agreements and turning over sensitive applications to outside vendors.

  • 6 digital marketing pros define programmatic advertising

    In conversations with marketing professionals, it's rare for five minutes to pass without the topic turning to programmatic advertising. Ad dollars spent on direct programmatic initiatives are expected to reach $9.8 billion by the end of 2014, according to eMarketer.

  • 13 tips to achieve Cloud success

    We interviewed 17 CIOs and IT leaders about their public and private cloud deployments, usage trends, skills requirements, lingering obstacles and future plans. Here are some nuggets of advice from these cloud giants.

  • Why we live in an anti-tech age

    Though it seems as if we're sourrounded by innovative products, services and technologies, there's a growing counter argument that we're living in a dismal era. Science is hated. Real technological progress has stalled. And what we call innovation today really isn't very innovative.

  • Microsoft Security Essentials may be throwing false positives for Trojan:DOS/Alureon.J

    It's looking more and more likely that Microsoft Security Essentials (MSE) is warning about a Trojan:DOS/Alureon.J infection when none exists.

  • Is it time to move your databases to the Cloud?

    Akamai Technologies, an engineering-heavy company that delivers a sizable chunk of the Internet's total traffic every day, is generally inclined to solve its technology challenges in house. Corey Scobie, vice president for Open Platform at Akamai, summarizes the company's default engineering culture and philosophy as, simply, "We should built it."

  • Blowing the whistle without blowing your career

    Technology professionals are among today's most infamous whistleblowers. The list of those who have made headlines for exposing corporate or government skulduggery includes Shawn Carpenter, a network security analyst who blew the lid off a Chinese cyberespionage ring; Bradley (now Chelsea) Manning, who shared more than 250,000 classified State Department cables with WikiLeaks; and Edward Snowden, who leaked top-secret information about NSA surveillance activities.

  • CBS Interactive CIO Says Shadow IT Is an Opportunity

    The term "shadow IT" has become a bugbear for IT organizations in recent years, an unknown that brings to mind security vulnerabilities or even suggests IT's creeping irrelevance to the business. But CBS Interactive CIO Steve Comstock says that's the wrong way to think of shadow IT. Instead, he says, IT should view shadow IT as an opportunity to understand the business and how to be an actual partner that understands the business's needs.

  • Sorriest technology companies of 2014

    It's so far been another sorry, sorry year in the technology industry, with big name companies, hot startups and individuals making public mea culpas for their assorted dumb, embarrassing and other regrettable actions.

  • Is the World as Flat as We Think?

    In 2005, Thomas Friedman's award-winning book The World Is Flat championed the transformative power of globalization. It highlighted how the traditional barriers of commerce, communication and politics were rapidly changing in these early years of the 21st century, due to the powerful impact of the Internet. It's a brilliant work whose core ideas continue to be proven as the digitization of every industry accelerates.

  • A common theme in identity and access management failure: lack of Active Directory optimization

    From the vantage point of most people, even technical folks, Active Directory (AD) seems like it's doing pretty well. How often can you not log in when you sit down at your PC? How often do you fail to find someone in the corporate directory in Outlook? How many times have you heard of an AD outage?

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