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  • 6 digital marketing pros define programmatic advertising

    In conversations with marketing professionals, it's rare for five minutes to pass without the topic turning to programmatic advertising. Ad dollars spent on direct programmatic initiatives are expected to reach $9.8 billion by the end of 2014, according to eMarketer.

  • 13 tips to achieve Cloud success

    We interviewed 17 CIOs and IT leaders about their public and private cloud deployments, usage trends, skills requirements, lingering obstacles and future plans. Here are some nuggets of advice from these cloud giants.

  • Why we live in an anti-tech age

    Though it seems as if we're sourrounded by innovative products, services and technologies, there's a growing counter argument that we're living in a dismal era. Science is hated. Real technological progress has stalled. And what we call innovation today really isn't very innovative.

  • Microsoft Security Essentials may be throwing false positives for Trojan:DOS/Alureon.J

    It's looking more and more likely that Microsoft Security Essentials (MSE) is warning about a Trojan:DOS/Alureon.J infection when none exists.

  • Is it time to move your databases to the Cloud?

    Akamai Technologies, an engineering-heavy company that delivers a sizable chunk of the Internet's total traffic every day, is generally inclined to solve its technology challenges in house. Corey Scobie, vice president for Open Platform at Akamai, summarizes the company's default engineering culture and philosophy as, simply, "We should built it."

  • Blowing the whistle without blowing your career

    Technology professionals are among today's most infamous whistleblowers. The list of those who have made headlines for exposing corporate or government skulduggery includes Shawn Carpenter, a network security analyst who blew the lid off a Chinese cyberespionage ring; Bradley (now Chelsea) Manning, who shared more than 250,000 classified State Department cables with WikiLeaks; and Edward Snowden, who leaked top-secret information about NSA surveillance activities.

  • CBS Interactive CIO Says Shadow IT Is an Opportunity

    The term "shadow IT" has become a bugbear for IT organizations in recent years, an unknown that brings to mind security vulnerabilities or even suggests IT's creeping irrelevance to the business. But CBS Interactive CIO Steve Comstock says that's the wrong way to think of shadow IT. Instead, he says, IT should view shadow IT as an opportunity to understand the business and how to be an actual partner that understands the business's needs.

  • Sorriest technology companies of 2014

    It's so far been another sorry, sorry year in the technology industry, with big name companies, hot startups and individuals making public mea culpas for their assorted dumb, embarrassing and other regrettable actions.

  • Is the World as Flat as We Think?

    In 2005, Thomas Friedman's award-winning book The World Is Flat championed the transformative power of globalization. It highlighted how the traditional barriers of commerce, communication and politics were rapidly changing in these early years of the 21st century, due to the powerful impact of the Internet. It's a brilliant work whose core ideas continue to be proven as the digitization of every industry accelerates.

  • A common theme in identity and access management failure: lack of Active Directory optimization

    From the vantage point of most people, even technical folks, Active Directory (AD) seems like it's doing pretty well. How often can you not log in when you sit down at your PC? How often do you fail to find someone in the corporate directory in Outlook? How many times have you heard of an AD outage?

  • Email Security Still a Struggle for Most Companies

    Is that email really from your bank or airline? Or a hacker pretending to be?

  • 11 Steps Attackers Took to Crack Target

    Despite the massive scale of the theft of Personal Identifiable Information (PII) and credit card and debit card data resulting from last year's data breach of retail titan Target, the company's PCI compliance program may have significantly reduced the scope of the damage, according to new research by security firm Aorato, which specializes in Active Directory monitoring and protection.

  • Verizon Says Passwords Suck, QR Codes Offer Better Way

    Are you sick of usernames and passwords as a method of user authentication? Verizon says it has a better way. It's beefing up its Universal Identity Services portfolio with a QR code login that enterprises can deploy to streamline logins for both internal and external users.

  • BYOD twists and turns keep CIOs off-balance

    In New York City, venerable companies give luxurious corporate cars to power brokers dressed in Armani suits driving down Wall Street. But across the country in San Francisco, you're more likely to see blue jeans-clad execs driving shared Zipcars to their wacky digs in SoMa, or south of Market.

  • Supervalu breach shows why move to smartcards is long overdue

    The data breach disclosed by Supervalu is another reminder about why the ongoing migration of the US payment system to smartcard technology can't happen fast enough.

  • Fitness Trackers are Changing Online Privacy -- and It's Time to Pay Attention

    Throughout the history of technology, few sectors have expanded and evolved as rapidly as today's burgeoning wearable tech market. Piles of unique and unusual, flashy and fancy -- often goofy and gimmicky -- new wearables are announced every week. There are smartwatches, smartglasses, intelligent socks and "onesies" for infants, rings for public transit payments and even "wearable tattoos."

  • 3D printing makes its move into production

    The use of 3D printing for finished goods is about to disrupt manufacturing and supply chains in a big way. Here's why, and here's how IT will be critical to that transition.

  • What Does the Future of Work Look Like?

    With Microsoft moving into a "mobile first, cloud first" world, an Apple smartwatch coming any day now and everyone else buying into the cloud computing hype, it can be easy to lose sight of what all of these developments do: Drive business forward by enabling employees to be more productive. Essentially, it's about the future of work.

  • How Marketing Picks Tech Vendors (and Who Decides)

    You can almost hear the hint of desperation in Matt Holton's voice.

  • Where your personal data goes when you're not looking

    What businesses know about any given individual is a lot. But what are companies doing with that data? Not as much as you might think -- at least not yet. Companies are getting more sophisticated, however.

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