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News
  • Most USB thumb drives can be reprogrammed to silently infect computers

    Most USB devices have a fundamental security weakness that can be exploited to infect computers with malware in a way that cannot easily be prevented or detected, security researchers found.

  • Attackers exploit remote access tools to compromise retail systems

    Malicious hackers are using remote access tools to break into retail point-of-sale systems and plant malware on them, the Department of Homeland Security warned.

  • Judge rules against Microsoft in email privacy case

    A U.S. district court judge has ruled against Microsoft in the company's effort to oppose a U.S. government search warrant for emails stored in Ireland.

  • Twitter reports a rise in government data requests

    The number of government requests worldwide seeking Twitter users' data, or the removal of content, increased during the first half of 2014.

  • Report: CIA improperly accessed Senate computers

    An internal CIA investigation has determined its employees improperly accessed computers used by the Senate Intelligence Committee while it was working on a report about the agency's post-9/11 detention and interrogation program, according to a report by McClatchy.

  • CISOs still struggle for respect from peers

    Chief information security officers (CISOs) continue to have a hard time gaining the respect of other C-suite executives despite the heightened focus overall on information security.

  • University researchers develop glasses-free display

    Fumbling around for your near-vision glasses to read the tablet screen? University researchers may have come up with a way to alleviate that problem.

  • Tor hints at possible U.S. government involvement in recent attack

    Hackers attacked the infrastructure of Tor, the anonymizing service, earlier this month in an incident that may have compromised a number of hidden services, according to an announcement posted today by the Tor Project's director, Roger Dingledine.

  • Great privacy essay: Fourth Amendment Doctrine in the Era of Total Surveillance

    When you signed up with your ISP, or with a wireless carrier for mobile devices, if you gave it any thought at all when you signed your name on the contract, you likely didn't expect your activities to be a secret, or to be anonymous, but how about at least some degree of private? Is that reasonable? No, as the law currently suggests that as a subscriber, you "volunteer" your personal information to be shared with third-parties. Perhaps not the content of your communications, but the transactional information that tells things like times, places, phone numbers, or addresses; transactional data that paints a very clear picture of your life and for which no warrant is required.

  • IBM buys access control and identity management firm CrossIdeas

    IBM has added to its security software portfolio with the purchase of Italian access control and identity management firm CrossIdeas for an undisclosed sum, the companies said Thursday.