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  • Cloud failures will happen. Are you ready?

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • 10 major Office 365 migration gotchas to avoid

    Migrating to Office 365 is becoming increasingly popular among businesses both large and small. The upside of moving from an on-premises environment to one hosted online by Microsoft offers compelling benefits. But switcher beware: Early Office 365 adopters have come back from their migration path battle-worn by a slew of unexpected perils they encountered along the way.

  • Best Practices for Salesforce.com Administrators

    The lists below summarize which tasks need to be done at standard intervals, including a pro-forma time budget. While the terminology and specifics focus on Salesforce.com specifically, the general administrative principles apply to any modern CRM system.

  • Getting the most out of backup and recovery

    CIO spoke to Don Williams, VP Asia Pacific & Japan at Veeam about calculating the cost of downtime, automating backup and recovery, and moving disaster recovery services into the cloud.

  • VMworld 2014, the Cloud and the Future of Enterprise IT

    Last week I visited VMworld 2014, where a horde of steely-eyed virtualization acolytes swarmed into the din of an expo floor, creating an atmosphere redolent of a religious revival being held in a Vegas casino. Vendor booths filled Moscone Center's South Hall to bursting, ranging from enormous displays presented by longtime technology stalwarts such as HP and IBM down to a multitude of tiny booths displaying products from new market entrants. All came to pay fealty to the industry's dominant virtualization player and claim their place in the VMware firmament. The outpouring of energy (and money) made the show floor something like a natural wonder akin to the Niagara Falls – overwhelming, awe-inspiring and vastly entertaining.

  • The Fappening: iCloud users, beware!

    The event dubbed by the internet as "the Fappening" is the largest celebrity nude photo leak in history. Although information is still emerging as to how, why and who is at fault, don't blame Apple for this latest security disaster. Celebrity nudes are not new; I am sure that everyone remembers the controversy surrounding Paris Hilton -- and Pamela Anderson before her. What makes this different is how these photos were taken. The celebrities involved were quick to respond to the news in a variety of intriguing ways, including the following tweet from Mary E. Winstead:

  • How to explain the cloud to your users

    Popular culture has exposed a fundamental knowledge gap in the ordinary consumer. Many people don't know where all their data is stored. They just know it's "in the cloud."

  • Is Amazon Web Services Really Down and Out?

    Two weeks ago, Amazon announced its quarterly earnings, reporting a much larger net loss than expected. There was much speculation by pundits about the reasons for the scale of the loss (including me in a CNBC segment). Many commentators placed responsibility for size of the loss on Amazon Web Services -- after AWS responded to an approximately 30 percent price cut by Google, the size of the "other" AWS category, in which Amazon places AWS revenues, fell 3 percent from the previous quarter.

  • We Are All Plank-Owners now

    In August 2012, SAIC, the $11B national security, engineering, and enterprise IT provider, announced that it would split in two: SAIC would deliver enterprise IT services to the government sector, and a new company, Leidos, would provide services in security, health and engineering.

  • Doing an Office 365 Migration the Right Way

    Migrating email from Exchange (on-premises) to Office 365 (in the cloud) would seem to be a pretty simple and straight forward process, and when you know what you are doing, it is a methodical process. However in the past 2-3 years that we've been doing Office 365 migrations, it's amazing the number of times we get called in to "fix something" that some other migration specialist did that has us shaking our heads wondering what they were thinking...

  • Solidifying Microsoft Azure Security for SharePoint and SQL in the Cloud

    More and more organizations are moving SharePoint and SQL workloads into Microsoft Azure in the cloud because of the simplicity of spinning up servers in the cloud, adding more capacity, decreasing capacity without having to BUY servers on-premise. What used to cost organizations $20,000, $50,000, or more in purchasing servers, storage, network bandwidth, replica disaster recovery sites, etc and delay SharePoint and SQL rollouts by weeks or month is now completely managed by spinning up virtual machines up in Azure and customizing and configuring systems in the Cloud.

  • The Uneven Future: 2 Telling Views of Cloud Adoption

    My last couple of columns have addressed cloud adoption patterns by IT organizations. Has Cloud Computing Been A Failed Revolution discussed the seeming ennui regarding cloud computing on the part of IT groups – that they seem less interested in the field, despite the belief on the part of vendors that the cloud represents tomorrow's technology infrastructure. Most recently, The Real Cloud Computing Revolution described three real-world examples of companies using cloud computing to solve problems they couldn't have addressed in the infrastructure models of traditional IT.

  • Who should really worry about Apple/IBM? Microsoft

    So Apple and IBM are hooking up. It's a match made in enterprise heaven, bringing together BYOD favorites the iPhone and the iPad with enterprise apps and cloud services from IBM. It's a win for Apple, which finally gets some serious business software chops, and for IBM, which gets device sex appeal.

  • Why That Zero-feature Cloud Software Release Doesn't Cost Zero Dollars

    When it comes to budgeting for cloud software, it's important to have some solid data about the cost of deploying a "zero-feature" update, the likelihood of encountering latent bugs, and the level of effort required for simple developer overhead and housekeeping. While there's some good data and solid advice out there from the Standish Group, as I mentioned in a recent article, I haven't seen any data that's particularly modern or really focused on the harsh realities of cloud software development.

  • Evan Schuman: What if you can't trust your inbox?

    Goldman Sachs is taking Google to court to force the cloud vendor to delete an email accidentally sent to a Gmail user. The consequences of a ruling for Goldman would be devastating.

  • Microsoft Azure ML -- Big Data Modeling in Azure

    Microsoft has jumped in with both feet with the release to Preview of a new Microsoft Azure-based tool that helps organizations do Machine Learning and predictive analysis all from a Web console.

  • Uncovering the Virtues of Virtual Desktops

    Can you name a single activity that consumes more IT staff time and presents more potential exposure to enterprise security risks than maintaining desktop and laptop computers across the enterprise? Despite the widespread use of remote desktop management tools, administrators must periodically descend upon offices and cubicles to upgrade or troubleshoot PCs.

  • The real Cloud computing revolution

    My last post noted that the IT industry appears to suffer from cloud computing ennui, as the number of Google searches for the term over the past two years has dropped significantly. I also said that other evidence indicates that many IT users appear to have put cloud computing in the "done and dusted" category despite not really understanding it very well.

  • Supreme Court goes 1 for 2 on big tech decisions

    Wednesday was a big day for technology cases in the Supreme Court. The Justices ruled on a pair of important cases that promise to have wide-ranging implications for the development and use of modern technology for years and decades to come. But the effects of the decisions aren't necessarily what either side in the cases has been arguing.

  • The truth about enterprises and the public cloud

    Many companies look to the public cloud to cut costs, overhead and time to deployment. However, businesses need to understand how dramatically a move to the cloud will affect a key constituency: The IT department.