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  • Sorriest technology companies of 2014

    It's so far been another sorry, sorry year in the technology industry, with big name companies, hot startups and individuals making public mea culpas for their assorted dumb, embarrassing and other regrettable actions.

  • Cloud Storage Users Share Pros and Cons of Leading Services

    Today's cloud storage/file-sync space is constantly evolving.

  • VMWorld 2014: Winners and Losers

    VMWorld 2014 was a whirlwind. The conference last week attracted 22,000 attendees, more than 250 exhibitors and spread across all three buildings of the Moscone Center in downtown San Francisco over a five-day period.

  • NHP Electrical Engineering Products on making the jump to public cloud

    A substandard data centre that leaked water and had air conditioning failures forced NHP Electrical Engineering Products to move its entire IT infrastructure to the cloud.

  • Cloud BI: Going where the data lives

    Historically, cloud BI has been mostly used by smaller businesses, but larger enterprises are starting to make the trek.

  • What Google I/O Moves Mean for Developers, Small Businesses and Consumers

    This year's Google I/O Conference showcased an enthusiastic love affair between Android and its fans. Sundar Pichai, senior vice president of Android, Chrome and Google Apps, told conference attendees that Android phones and tablets are everywhere. Android now has 1 billion users who check their phones 100 billion times a day, take 93 million selfies and walk 1.5 trillion steps.

  • How to Set Up a New Business Using Only Cloud Services

    As recently as five years ago, setting up a new business and equipping it for a PC-literate workforce was a costly affair. You needed to acquire server hardware and pay various software licensing fees.

  • Why a Media Giant Sold Its Data Center and Headed to the Cloud

    Two weeks ago, venerable media company Condé Nast -- publisher of magazines like Vogue, The New Yorker and Wired -- decommissioned its Newark, Del. data center. The 67,200 square feet facility had already been sold and the deal closed. The 105-year-old company had gone all-in with the cloud.

  • The rise of the personal cloud

    Meet the people who say they are putting users back in control of their own data management and privacy.

  • Amazon Web Services Sharpens Focus on Public Sector

    Hardly content to rest on its laurels, Amazon is adding clients in the government, education and nonprofit sectors, vying for public-sector contracts and looking to build its apps marketplace into a research and development hub.

  • Impact of today's hardware and software applications in Cloud-based environments: Part 1

    As an industry, we have been looking at cloud-based technologies both from private and public structure and how best to optimize design, engineer and develop such technologies to better optimize the world of wireless and the Internet of Everything.

  • VMware: We're aiming to be a top 3 Cloud provider

    Gartner's annual Magic Quadrant is a sort of who's who of the cloud computing market. And while VMware made the company's most recent list, it didn't receive the highest of marks.

  • Healthcare Cloud Use Prevalent, Poised to Spread, HIMSS Says

    Survey results from the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society's analytics arm says more than 80 percent of organizations use cloud services, primarily to host apps and data. Concerns remain, particularly around security and uptime, but most users seem optimistic.

  • How to Use Evernote to Improve Your Productivity

    With more than 100 million users, Evernote is popular for good reason. The app is for much more than just jotting down notes, though -- you can add contacts, collaborate and even snap pictures of paper notes. Here are some tips from getting the most out of Evernote.

  • Review: Microsoft Office Online vs. Apple iWork for iCloud vs. Google Drive

    Online word processors, spreadsheets, and presentation apps can be surprisingly useful, or surprisingly lame, and not even Microsoft aces Office document compatibility

  • Hopping aboard the cloud

    Three very different organisations - Open Universities Australia, Les Mills, and Boeing - talk about how they are using cloud in their operational environments.

  • How to Use OpenStack in Your Small Business

    The OpenStack cloud platform works well for companies that aim to deploy software or infrastructure as a service but remain wary of doing so using public cloud services. Here's how to find out if OpenStack is right for your business.

  • CTO Says Cloud Services Earn Vote of International Election Monitoring Group

    The National Democratic Institute has workers in 65 countries -- not all of them friendly. To support its growing global mission, and to improve efficiency without buying more hardware, the nonpartisan nonprofit has spent the last four years migrating to the cloud.

  • Cloud Apps Soar, CIOs Take on New Role

    As cloud apps become more business-critical, the CIO is emerging as the cloud services broker. In this new IT model, which is expected to expand rapidly in the next 12 months, CIOs can push cloud service providers to deliver detailed SLAs.

  • Why CIOs shouldn't block rogue Cloud apps

    Enterprises have an average 461 Cloud apps running in their organisations (nine to 10 times IT's estimates), according to some reports. Line-of-business managers hesitate to bring in the CIO out of fear of being blocked. If CIOs can remove this fear, everyone, it turns out, benefits.