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Stories by Paul Venezia

Put your API on a JSON diet

By Paul Venezia | 31 March, 2015 00:49

Last week I discussed design considerations for APIs, given that APIs aren't applications and shouldn't be treated as such. At small scales, APIs that come along for the ride with bulky Web frameworks might be fine, but beyond that you're asking for trouble. If you're building an API that will serve a large number of clients, your API code should be thin and tight, as well as make liberal use of caching. Otherwise, the future headaches will be crippling.

First look: VMware vSphere 6 keeps its edge

By Paul Venezia | 13 March, 2015 07:06

In the not so distant past, VMware held a long and commanding lead in the server virtualization space, offering core features that were simply unmatched by the competition. In the past few years, however, competition in virtualization has been fierce, the competitors have drawn near, and VMware has been left with fewer ways to distinguish itself.

7 free tools every network needs

By Paul Venezia | 14 October, 2014 21:16

In the real estate world, the mantra is location, location, location. In the network and server administration world, the mantra is visibility, visibility, visibility. If you don't know what your network and servers are doing at every second of the day, you're flying blind. Sooner or later, you're going to meet with disaster.

How to choose the right Linux distro

By Paul Venezia | 24 September, 2014 20:09

Unlike most other desktop and server operating systems, Linux comes in a wide variety of flavors, each based on a common core of the Linux kernel and various GNU user space utilities. If you're running Linux servers -- or Linux desktops, for that matter -- you should understand the important differences and be discerning about which flavor of Linux is best suited to any given situation. This article will help you do just that.

Review: QNAP NAS meets XBMC media center

By Paul Venezia | 19 July, 2013 10:12

QNAP's TS-669L can store all your content and play it directly to your TV, though HD playback could be smoother

Review: Puppet Enterprise 3.0 pulls more strings

By Paul Venezia | 16 July, 2013 10:14

Version 3.0 of Puppet Labs' configuration automation tool shines with speed boosts, orchestration improvements, and deeper support for Windows servers

Review: VMware's vCenter Operations Manager lightens the load

By Paul Venezia | 29 May, 2013 10:08

Monitoring virtual servers for availability, performance, health, and workload capacity has never been easy, but Operations Manager goes a long way toward that goal

How to script: A Bash crash course

By Paul Venezia | 08 March, 2013 11:08

An easy step-by-step guide to the Bash command-line shell and shell scripting

How-to: Get started with MySQL

By Paul Venezia | 15 November, 2012 11:13

An easy step-by-step guide to setting up a MySQL database server, along with phpMyAdmin, on Fedora, CentOS, or Ubuntu

First look: Driving VMware vSphere 5.1

By Paul Venezia | 11 September, 2012 15:18

VMware's new, Flash-based Web management GUI is easy to like, but it comes with a few gotchas

Review: Dell blade servers tip the scales

By Paul Venezia | 06 September, 2012 13:35

Dell's M1000e blade system wows with novel new blades, improved management, modular I/O, and 40G out the back

How to install Apache on Linux

By Paul Venezia | 11 July, 2012 10:07

An easy step-by-step guide to setting up an Apache Web server on Fedora, CentOS, or Ubuntu

Fundamental Oracle flaw revealed

By Paul Venezia | 18 January, 2012 09:24

Over the past two months, InfoWorld has been researching a flaw in Oracle's flagship database software that could have serious repercussions for Oracle database customers, potentially compromising the security and stability of Oracle database systems.

Migrating from T1 to fiber WAN

By Paul Venezia | 08 December, 2011 02:16

Back in the old days, the only realistic way to connect multiple remote sites was by T1 or T3 delivered either point-to-point or via Frame Relay. These were either slow and expensive or fast and unbelievably expensive. Then came MPLS, which dispensed with the need for point-to-point circuits from site to site, but was still bound by high expense. You got what you paid for. These circuits were not only reliable, but if a T1 or T3 circuit dropped, you could generally count on the carrier to jump on the problem quickly and resolve it with some expediency.

Set up your office network for telecommuting

By Paul Venezia | 30 September, 2011 05:12

There comes a time in most businesses when circumstances dictate that one or more users work from home either full- or part-time. In other cases, it may simply be convenient for business owners and employees to be able to use company resources from home or (unfortunately) while on vacation.

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