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2000 school students engaged with tech leaders at BiG Day In launch

2000 school students engaged with tech leaders at BiG Day In launch

The student-led ICT careers conference will run in at least 12 locations across Australia

L to R: Victor Dominello MP, John Ridge ACSF and Vice Chancellor UTS – Prof Attila Brungs.

L to R: Victor Dominello MP, John Ridge ACSF and Vice Chancellor UTS – Prof Attila Brungs.

More than 2,000 secondary school students heard insights from around 50 experienced technology professionals at the BiG Day In event launch at the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) earlier this month.

The roadshow event, hosted by the Australian Computer Society Foundation (ACSF), is an IT careers conference designed by students that are interested in pursuing careers in technology.

Throughout the two-day Sydney launch, attendees heard presentations from seasoned IT professionals from Adobe, Ernst & Young, Microsoft, IBM, HP, Realestate.com.au, Tata Consultancy Services, Westpac, CBA, WiseTech Global, the Federal and NSW governments, and a number of smaller organisations.

Exhibition stands were available to students to ask questions about ICT and technology careers with featured organisations.

In 2015, the BiG Day In included 161 speakers, 165 exhibitors and 69 organisations involved in delivering 11 events nationally, providing insights for 6,500 students.

This year, the event will be run in at least 12 locations nationwide including Sydney, Wagga Wagga, Newcastle, Brisbane, the Sunshine Coast, Melbourne, Adelaide, Canberra and Perth.

Hon Victor Dominello MP, NSW Minister for Innovation and Better Regulation, speaking to students at the Sydney BiG Day In event.
Hon Victor Dominello MP, NSW Minister for Innovation and Better Regulation, speaking to students at the Sydney BiG Day In event.

Speaking at the Sydney launch, Victor Dominello, NSW Minister for Innovation and Better Regulation, said events such as the BiG Day In help to encourage young people to engage with technology professionals in order to access information they need to make an informed decision on their future and career.

“The digital age has created a wealth of new employment opportunities. Events such as the BiG Day In empower young people to engage with technology professionals and help to create the jobs that will define Australia’s future economy,” he said.

“I couldn’t think of a more important career development opportunity than the BiG Day In. It was inspiring to see so many students involved and I congratulate the ACSF and UTS for their leadership.”

The BiG Day In event also aims to equip teachers with the latest information on the types of IT careers available for their students.

John Ridge AM, executive director of the ACS Foundation (ACSF), added that the role of the ACSF is to help and assist students to make the transition from their studies into the industry.

“Recognising the importance of relevant industry experience in helping students secure their first job is why ACSF run a series of programs enabling students to gain that experience,” he said.

Event sponsor, Tata Consultancy Services (TCS), said it was critical that companies, government and our broader community work together to encourage young Australians to study STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics).

“Today 75 per cent of the fastest growing jobs in Australia will require STEM skills… The BiG Day In events reach thousands and we hope will inspire a new generation of innovators, problem solvers and STEM professionals," said Deborah Hadwen, CEO Australia and New Zealand, TCS.

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Tags roadshowtechnology leadersstudentsSTEMAustralian Computing SocietytrainingconferenceICT careerscareer opportunitiesBiG Day InACSF

More about ACSACS FoundationAustralian Computer SocietyErnst & YoungHPMicrosoftRealestate.com.auTataTata Consultancy ServicesTechnologyUTSWestpacWiseTech Global

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