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Facebook to share user data with Instagram

More than 14,000 Facebook members show their disapproval.

Facebook may soon share users’ data with photo sharing service Instagram, the social networking giant said in its recent proposed changes to its data use policy.

The change means Facebook users could receive more targeted advertisements as their personal data on the social network and its affiliated business Instagram will be used by Facebook to build unified profiles.

“We may share information we receive with businesses that are legally part of the same group of companies that Facebook is part of, or that become part of that group (often these companies are called affiliates). Likewise, our affiliates may share information with us as well.” Facebook wrote in its proposed document.

Facebook said that it intends to use personal data “to help provide, understand, and improve our services and their own services”. However, privacy concerns have arisen from the Facebook community since the social network announced its proposed changes.

More than 14,000 comments on the announcement were made by Facebook users, many of them reacting negatively. Many users, who posted comments on the Facebook Site Governance page, stated that the social-networking service does "NOT have my permission to utilise any of my profile information nor any of the content contained herein including, but not limited to my photographs, and/or the comments made about my photographs or any other ‘art’ related posts on my profile…

“Nor do I give permission to Facebook or any of its associates to release any of my postings, photos, etc to any employers, background checking agencies, governmental or law enforcement agencies…

“I warn any person and/or institution and/or agent and/or agency of any government structure, including but not limited to the federal Government and provincial of Canada and the United States (and all other countries where Facebook is utilised including Australia) that attempts to use or monitor this website or its associated sites, does not have my permission to use any of the information in my profile, or any of the content in this document, including, but not limited to my photos, and/or the comments made about my photos or any other image of art posted on my profile…”

Facebook is allowing its users to review and comment on the proposed changes before 9am Pacific Standard Time (PST), November 28. Facebook chief privacy officer Erin Egan will then respond to any privacy concerns and questions in a webcast – details are to come.

Follow Rebecca Merrett on Twitter: @Rebecca_Merrett

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